Friday, October 12, 2012

Finishing Touches


I promised an update on William's progress with his tombstones. Actually, shortly after the post about the tombstones, he had a small crisis of faith. He's put so much time and thought into these, that finishing them, and achieving the quality, aged look that he wanted to get began to feel, for him, close to impossible. He's learning as he goes, and his paint sprayer was malfunctioning, and stuff was... you know doing what stuff does... not working the way he needed it to. I was no help, because all I could see was what looked like a success... really cool, good looking markers. But he was determined to achieve exactly the authentic, realistic, and weathered look of actual cemetery headstones, and he was not about to settle for really cool.

And he was right. The next level is remarkable. He's pleased, too. It took many experiments, and adjustments, and now he is finding the right colors, textures, and layering methods to make the headstones look as though they have been worn by time and nature, by slow decay, cold nights, damp summers.

He's making great progress, and we are seeing a project many, many months in the making come to a happy conclusion.

Construction foam, research, regard and respect for historic craftsmanship, a Dremel- high speed rotary tool, paint, paint, and more paint... he's brought all of this together to great effect.

Somehow, finished with William's great care, these seem so much more than a Halloween prop. They really do convey the thoughtfulness, and esteem shown for the loved ones who have passed on. The motifs, the time spent to create those original pieces... it makes me reflective and mindful of the beauty conveyed in these traditions, and remembrances. Well done, William.


8 comments:

  1. They are great, hope to see them placed in an appropriate surrounding soon.

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  2. he could sell these to a prop company, or costume designer events/scenery place.

    Does he have any inklings to make props for movies?

    Quite a talent!

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  3. Very realistic. He's very talented!

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  4. Yes, very well done. Can't wait to see them "in person".

    Tutu

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  5. Honestly, these look like they were etched with a crude tool, planted in the earth, and weathered and chipped over the centuries. They look ancient and very heavy! Excellent work, William.

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  6. Very well done, indeed. He is a master.

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  7. Wow! I am so impressed. They look absolutely REAL. And in real life, I'm sure they're even more authentic looking. Good job! That family of yours is so creative; every single one of you all!

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