Monday, November 19, 2012

Goat Gratitude

Look familiar? I already posted this portrait of Ada and Tasha Goat, but it's too adorable, and I want the whole wide world to see and know the wonder of our dear little ungulates. They make me extremely happy.

They're full grown, you know. So they really are little dears.

They have hairy chins, and I guess I feel a certain familiarity with them on this point.
ahem

Nothing seems to get them down... not for good.

They love to be brushed and pet, and scratched affectionately on their cheeks, along the jaw, beneath their ears.

Goats have horizontal, slit-shaped pupils, an adaptation which increases peripheral depth perception. Because goats' irises are usually pale, their contrasting pupils are much more noticeable than in animals such as cattle, deer, most horses and many sheep, whose similarly horizontal pupils blend into a dark iris and sclera. Thank you, Wikipedia.

Goats are not grazers, like sheep and cows. They are more like deer, browsing for leaves, vines, and even peeling the bark off trees.

Best of all, in my humble opinion, Ada and Tasha seem to know that life is beautiful, that play is marvelous, and there's no reason you shouldn't dance... with, or without, music playing. They just seem to rise above worry and fretting, happily frolicking forth into their days. And one more thing... they snuggle me, awkwardly, clumsily, and dearly. It makes me extremely happy.

9 comments:

  1. Natalie - I've wondered, do you milk your goats and if so, what do you do with the milk? Any cheese or anything?

    They _are_ such sweet little dears.

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    1. The goats will be one year old in February, and I think we have just entered the time of year when they could get preggers... if we we're prepared to get into that! Right now, they are like really ridiculous dogs... fun pets. But we are seriously considering attempting the whole pregnant-kids-milk challenge.
      I think it would be amazing to make cheese!

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  2. I love how you describe those sweeties! I'd also like to know the answer to Jenny's question – as well as how long did it take to get used to their unusual eyes?

    P.S. I'm sending positive "warming" vibes to your oven, for this week especially!

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    1. We are not milking, yet... it's a big commitment, since kids come with milk production, and we would have to be prepared for milking them twice a day.

      Those eyes! I guess I am used to them, but yeah... they are funny-funky-freaky! lol

      I am about to try the oven (AGAIN!) Wouldn't it be nice? sigh
      Thank you for those warming vibes, friend!

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    2. Wow! I just read your sidebar. I didn't know I had such magical powers!!

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  3. Having made the decision early on to not get goats, I have to say I am really, really happy you decided otherwise! It lets me enjoy all the pleasures and joys vicariously through you, Tasha and Ada!

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    1. They surprise me. There is some kind of scale, or graph, and it would demonstrate how interested and willing I was to jump into having goats. Well, now that they're here... I think the graph would show my enthusiasm for them "off the chart!" Anytime you need a goat dose, you let me know!

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  4. Hey Natalie - I was thinking about your oven and noticed you'd tweeted it turned on today! I was thinking maybe you should just leave it on until Thanksgiving. It's only 48 hours and you could just keep it low? Crazy, I know. I just thought I'd share.

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  5. I'm definitely planning to have goats when I retire - which may be years away - but they're on my wishlist, with my cottage in the country, an acre of land (or two), and maybe a couple of little Kunekune pigs to keep them company. The little goats will be for cuddling though!

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